Category Archives: geology

Our Recent Geological Hike Is Well Worth Repeating

Gary Prost above recycling center (4) small

Geologist Gary Prost’s talk went from the planetary to the hyper local, as he discussed what can be learned from the exposed rock face above the recycling center, a former quarry.

Geologist Gary Prost’s talk went from the planetary to the hyper local, as he discussed what can be learned from the exposed rock face above the recycling center, a former quarry.

Geologist Gary Prost led more than 30 hikers on an informative and at times exciting Hillside Natural Area Geology Walk earlier this month. If you missed it be assured – we will have Gary lead this hike again.

The hike attracted adults and families, and even though Gary handed out a reading list as part of his walk, the event was far from academic in tone. Kids on the hike loved getting up close and personal with the rocks as Gary explained their composition and how they were created.

Watch our website and newsletter for more. We hope to put this hike on again in the fall or early winter.

In addition, Gary, a retired professional geologist, prepared a useful handout, undoubtedly the best, short guide to the geology of El Cerrito we have ever seen. You can find it here.

The three-hour hike began at the Schmidt Lane trailhead to the Hillside Natural Area, wended its way through Madera Open Space, visited the nearby EBMUD water tank, went past the Berkeley Country Club’s golf course, and headed down the Great Western Power Trail along Moeser Lane.

A young potential geologist gets up close and personal with the subject during our hike.

During its course we learned about plate tectonics and how the movement of these plates created the California – and the El Cerrito – we know today. We learned to differentiate blue schist from rhyolite, two of the most common rocks found on our hillsides.

One is formed by the movement of the tectonic plates through subduction. The other is volcanic. We learned also about other rocks, including greywacke, about the work of thrust faults in making and remaking our landscape, and about strike slip faults.

Just as we did in our recent It’s Our Fault Hike led by another geologist, David Schwartz, we observed the Hayward fault as it can be seen along the golf course. Gary also showed us a spring that bubbles out of the ground along Regency Court, another sign of seismic activity.

I for one will never look at the El Cerrito Hills the same way again.

The city’s Hillside Natural Area is a beautiful setting for any sort of hike.

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